Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Diwali and a MORA give-away.

It is Diwali. Everyone has strung up lights. Everyone is making sweets and snacks. I don't know if it has to do with the passing years or if I never felt much excitement about Diwali. Or any festival for that matter. Festivals are the one time I've felt more like a spectator than a participant. I wear the festive clothes become happy to meet people, but somewhere inside I don't quite get it. Maybe I'm just a little weird. I woke up happy today, and lit lamps with mom. Who is highly excited about everything and one of the most quietly (but firmly) enthusiastic human beings I've ever seen :) :) So everyone is wishing each other. And all is well and the good cheer is contagious :) And i want to celebrate in a way that has meaning for me. I know all of you love Mora Sarees and Ritika Mittal. I do :) 
This is for all of you who faithfully read this blog despite the erratic posting. Really. Thank you.
For sticking with the blog and with me.
So we will have a Mora Giveaway for Diwali :) 


When Ritika and me were doing the Mora shoot this blog had turned 5, and we were discussing it, so I was telling her about the give-aways I was planning & she said - even I want to do a give-away on your blog! How do I do it? I explained and both of us promptly got busy with our lives. I didn't push for it because i knew her life was crazy busy, there was just too much happening and like me she is a one-woman army. But before she left Bombay, she called me and said we have to meet & I have to give you the give-away! 

I always smile when I think of the few times I have spent with Ritika, full of mad laughter, high voltage, but always at home. Whether we are dancing through the streets of Kohima, whether we are bumping along in a rick in Mumbai or sharing our deepest thoughts over a quiet meal. Always full of light. Sometimes bright, sometimes blinding and sometimes muted but very warm. So here's celebrating the festival of lights with a MORA giveaway.

Sharing a few behind-the -scenes pics from the Mora Shoot.
 Kajal or Kohl was the only make up we wore for the shoot. You can see gorgeous Kalpana Goenka's pictures wearing Mora here.
You can see a few of my pictures wearing MORA here.
We were bumping along on our way back from the shoot & I saw this. This has to be one of my fav pictures of Ritika :)

Coming back to the give-away. 

What do you do to win this gorgeous MORA Stole?
Just share with us in a comment what tradition means to you and what you do to keep it alive in your life.  This give-away is not limited to only those who live in India. Everybody stands a chance & everybody can comment :) :) 
The last date for commenting is 20th November 2012. Spread the word and comment away :)

62 comments:

shaoli said...

Hi
Wishing u a very happy diwali.I am a lurker and am taking diwali (meant for new beginnings) to delurk.
Diwali for me is all about coming to terms with oneself and being at peace with what u have achieved in the journey.It is about living life to the fullest irrespective of what ever u are served.

rani@omshesaid said...

A new tradition that we only started last year is doing something called the Polar Bear Dip, in Cayucos California. On New year's Day those who wish to can start the new year in a spirited (some say crazy!) way by jumping into the ocean! Yes it's cold, but very invigorating! A way of starting the new year fresh!!! Thanks for this chance to win! Love Love Love your blog!

Jayla said...

To me, tradition and culture are interlinked, and what personifies culture better than language? Accepting and using our language makes us accept who we are and where we come from. And that is a struggle that third culture kids face. Therefore, living in South Africa,I try my best to encourage my kids to speak their mother tongue at home. It's hard work, but, I'm going with the maxim 'If at first you don't succeed, try, try and try again.' :)

vineeta said...

Shaoli, Thank you for delurking and being the 1st to comment :) :) If you are interested in the give- away, the question is "what tradition means to you and what you do to keep it alive in your life." I'm sorry for being anal, but I really do want you to have a fair chance at winning, that's all :)
I'm hoping you will comment again :)

Lotus Gal said...

To me, traditions are an invisible bridge that connect the past with the future, and each generation with every generation before and after, so long as the tradition is honored and upheld. When I prepare food for my son the same way my grandmother prepared it for me, he has a tangible connection with my childhood experience, and with her, even though she passed away without knowing him. When my husband and I celebrate holidays with our children in some of the same ways we each celebrated with our own parents, we're not just sharing experience, but also creating a sort of collective memory. The colors and scents and tastes and sounds of the rituals my parents shared with me will be locked in my son's memory when I share them with him, and that will keep him connected to his family even when distance or death separate us.

As in fish, lish said...

I've lived all over the world... Africa, US, UK, India and the UAE. And in the latter years it's been about living alone, so keeping tradition or any kind of root alive, became all the more important.
But wherever I've been, I've always had a connection with flowers. Not bouquets on order but all that grows free and pretty.
I think it began with my Godmother who'd always mail me letters with Edelweiss from the Alps.
In Lagos, we lived in large homes with tropical gardens. Being the close-knit expat circle, friends' Moms played the role of naanis/daadis/maasis/buas. Mine would sit me down with a basket of frangipanis we plucked and teach me to weave garlands for the local temple.
When I moved to Dubai, I 'happened to find' an apartment looking over a lake with Frangipani trees. I didn't realise it then but doing up the altar always took me back to innocence partly because I'd go collecting wild flowers early morning.
Moving back to Bombay spoils me for family and people but thanks to the toran-wala down the street, I do miss the charm of my flower basket.
So this afternoon, as I began putting things together for Laxmi puja & the diyas, I strolled along our tiny garden aka the 20-odd pots outside our window. And plucked my own offering. Wild flowers of all colours, sizes and fragrances.
The simple, little hand-picked ritual with myself lives on:-)

Lakshmi Mantha said...

This year my daughter is is almost-but not quite- 4years old is participating in a dance. We live in Canada and celebrate all festivities with lots of fun! Layla will be one of the Ashtalakshmis and will be all dressed up :-).
On the weekend we had friends over for dinner and all the kids lit diyas, made wishes and told mythological stories. This week Layla's kindergarten class will be talking about Diwali .Wonderful living in such a multicultural country.

Ruchika Kumar said...

Happy Diwali! I love your blog and love all things Mora. Tradition to me means simplicity without layers. I am a textile designer finding my way back to the past and through my art I try to find tradition. Tradition to live. Tradition to be. The way it used to be in the past. That is tradition for me.
Thank you again for organizing this giveaway! I'm sure whomever wins will be ecstatic!

big mamabird said...

hi from wet and cold vermont! we keep tradition by cooking from scratch , writing snailmail letters to our far flung family, raise chickens for eggs and meat and try to buy local...of course we are really a global family who have settled down to nest for the sake of the kids, but our dreams and good memories span the planet...so it is with great pleasure that i seek out blogs and sites like yours, to keep my toes wet! thanks for the pleasure,Vineeta!
love from carroll, the (non-blogging) vermont mama bird!

Shilpa Kamath said...

Happy Diwali Vineeta and Ritika. Thank you for an opportunity to win this gorgeous MORA.

All these years,I have seen my parents and grandparents celebrate various festivals and special occasions with great enthusiasm and while they have incorporated new ideas with time, the old rituals have been an integral part of the festivities. While they have explained why certain rituals are performed or traditions followed and encouraged us (their kids) to follow the same, they have never forced their thoughts or beliefs on us.

Whether it's a simple traditional Arthi on birthdays before we cut the cake or the more elaborate rituals during the puja on Diwali, Dussera, Krishnashtami, Ugadi,etc I try to follow what I have learnt so that my children can someday do the same. But if rituals/traditions become meaningless repetition with time,I let them go.

Dita said...

Happy Diwali to you and all your readers...

Tradition to me is anything that you do to keep the memories alive...like lighting the 14 candles on the eve of Diwali no matter where we have been...whether it was back at home with Ma and Baba or in a hotel room in Texas with my husband or out in the snowy patio in Wisconsin with little Ishaan when he was only 2 or more recently with Ishaan and Jiya around our place in Melbourne...it is what we do to keep the memories alive and in the process build more...

:)if you have the time come visit my blog where you will find my rumblings and my artwork:)

www.meetDita.blogspot.com

shilpa said...

Hi,Happy Diwali......Tradition is simplicity,beauty and connection with our previous generations for me....every festival that we celebrate at home is done exactly in the way my grand parents have done during their times....there is an intrinsic bonding during festival times.....lots of love to you :)


shilpa

Pavani said...

Since age 5, I have always stayed away from home and for me festivals take my thoughts to home and parents in the fondest way. My parents have always made sure I feel included in the home festivities, whether it was by posting me beautiful picture cards when I was in boarding school or whether it is my dad sending me virtual diwali crackers through email during my PhD now! :) And that's what tradition means to me.. it means loving the near and dear ones.. and sending that love through means, both old and new :) Thank you for introducing Mora.. I have no idea how I missed this gem of a designer all these days! Thanks and loads of love for all the wonderful work that you do.

Tammy Mukkada said...

Tradition is a loving gift we share with our children today, and hope that they will always share it forward. Thank you for sharing your gifts with us, Artnlight! :)

Nagalakshmi V said...

such gorgeous saris!

keeping traditions alive... a strong question. i live outside india but my roots are very deep and i married someone from outside my community so we have double the work to do. mostly, i talk to the elders in the family on what we do for onam, diwali, vishu, navratri. that's the best source of info. then i try to do at home what i can. most importantly, i have a food blog and share age-old dying recipes, also keeping them alive for years to come.

Rashmi said...

As an individual, I've actually got to the stage where I feel bowed down under the burden of traditions and resent them somewhat. At the same time, as a parent I find them very important to impart to my kids, in order to preserve the order of continuance, and to give them a feeling of how small and big things are from various perspectives.

So, we clean the house, wear new clothes, light the diyas and make the sweets. My tiny rebellion came in the form of cupcakes which were our Diwali sweets this year :)

Love your blog, it makes me want to fly (imaginatively, of course, as I don't quite like heights, lol).

anchal said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
priyanka jain said...

Tradition used to be a very daunting and scary proposition as it meant being decked up and smile at people I didn't necessarily like when I was a kid. The little I did then, stopped completely when I came to Mumbai and began to live a life on my terms - free and independent. I escaped festivals, weddings anything related to family and traditions in the guise of being busy and at work. It worked.

But when I began praying again, little things like lighting a candle, decorating diyas, using incense, fragrances and closing my eyes to pray began to gain meaning. It began to give me love, light and peace. So I realised, tradition was scary when it was imposed and I didnt understand it but when it came from the heart, it became a prayer not a ritual or routine. It meant life.:)

Sara said...

Tradition to me means a set of activities that rejuvenates me, my family, brings in a gush of nostalgia! A time to pour out the same ol' tales to my kids (late in the night ripped by crackers) who take a break from playing, just to see me happy, repeating my stories again and again.
Tradition to me is a legacy, a treasure that I want to give my children as an inheritance. Though my nonverbal autistic son knows nothing about the festivals but around diwali time, he unpacks the strings of fairy lights with as much gusto as e did and remembers where exactly to place them. My other 2 sons, take time off the computer and PS3 to sit around and stir, mix and cheer, chop and microwave, to set, roll and wrap in beautiful wrappers. The legacy of handmade delicacies carries on but with a difference. The difference is that now my traditional is more participatory. Being a single mother the traditionals do bring a lump when I can’t do it all or go all the way, but then what the heck, I am working on passing on the legacy in a much more beautiful way :)

Sara said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
rajvi said...

For me Tradition is not leaving your roots behind..not forgetting who you actually are in whatever situation or in place you are...according to me tradition has nothing to do with modernity..one can be traditional and modern at the same time..like on Diwali we worship goddess Lakshmi and at the same time we gamble too..For me tradition is to take care of your family and friends and for that you don't need a specific day to show..if you are attached to your basic ethics and all so i guess one has the right to call self traditional..by wearing ethnic wear on some specific occaions no one becomes traditional ..tradition should be in one's soul and mind..and it should be reflected by his/her acts not by mere clothing..I personally to up keep my tradition spends every week end with my people as in todays's busy and fast life nothing can be healed if its not touched by human influence..

Barnita De said...

Family traditions are passed down generations. What starts as a faith or belief, becomes a custom over the years. Over a period of time, due to various influences, these traditions evolve. It is upto us to decide to follow them or not.

For me a family tradition is as valuable as the family silver. Some of them started generations before, when why, no one knows. We learned and observed them as kids and enjoyed them. It is upto me to pass on the joys to my daughters as well.

Without going into elaborate rituals, I try my best to follow the pure and pristine part of the traditions. Like lighting the 14 lamps inside the house on chaturdashi – the day before Diwali; praying and giving a simple offering to the God on any special day, touching the feet of elders to seek their blessings on Biyoja dashami. Each one reminds us of the rich culture we have and the simple reason behind each one of them

Roanna said...

For me, tradition could mean a lot of things. Some are customs and some little habits and ways I picked up on my own! Tradition is something you can re-invent time and again much as it feels like an oxymoron of the word itself. But yes, for me, tradition is something innate, sometimes something you create... but whatever it is, it's a part of you. Who you are.

P.S. Sorry, I got a little carried there! Happy Diwali. :-)

Roanna said...

It could be something as simple as gifts. Giving them to your favourite people on days when you just feel happy... just because you want to, mostly. That's a tradition I like.

Chondryma said...

Well "Tradition" to me is finding time out to believe in your family beliefs and sync'ng yourself to the happiness of celebrating family moments together. Tradition is a mascot of binding relationships and thus spreading love amongst the loved ones.

HAPPY DIWALI AND LOVE BEING LOVED ~

Purplemango-design-branding-advertising said...

Tradition means a beautiful idea that was planted by people for a certain reason at a certain time. I find ways to interpret and nurture that idea wherever I am, in whatever way I can.

writerzblock said...

Lovely contest, and gorgeous 'Mora' :-)

As for 'tradition', all the time I lived in India, I thought it was boring to follow traditions. Waking up early in the morning, oil-bath, prayers, meeting/greeting relatives/friends. Hmph..I thought it was such a waste of time!

But I couldn't have been more wrong!!!!

It is only when I left India that I realised what tradition meant. Living miles away from home, simple things like wishing the other mums 'a happy Diwali' at the school gate fills us with a warm glow :-) Seeing other families following a part of one's own tradition brings back fond memories of childhood. Of our roots!! A gentle hug, a box of sweets shared among a group of children, the sight of someone wearing a sari (even if it isn't a Mora ;-))... takes me one step closer 'home' :-)

Tradition re-affirms our identity. Tradition keeps us closer to our roots, no matter which part of the world we live in. Tradition is the lifeline that keeps us connected, and makes us part of a much, much larger family.

starlite said...

Tradition is the starting point of my enquiry of the world and of myself. Questioning and believing, slowly stripping away whats not me and creating anew. Some times, for a few moments, it is acceptance, an embrace, a warm fuzzy feeling. Some times its a rejection, a frown, a momentary compromise. Only to nudge me once more, to think, to understand and make my own.

Swati Seth said...

Tradition and culture are interlinked. Also, both tradition n culture are something which are passed on from one generation to another. It could be anything from a family rituals to a pickle or pappad recipe, mother tongue to folk art n music. The life of a tradition or culture depends on how the generation that receives it, chooses to protect it, revive it, share it n passes on to the next generation.

Whether at home or at work, I try and do my bit to keep traditions alive. At work my venture is trying to promote, support and revive traditional folk art n craft. At home I make all the effort to learn recipes of various home-made pickles, traditional snacks n dishes from my mother..the recipes that were passed on from her mom n mother-in-law to her. I am often laughed at for doing so n asked why do I need to put in so much effort to learn n make such stuff when its easily available in the market n my answer to them is I grew up having 'nani' n 'maa ke haanth ka' pickles n snacks n if we all switch to branded pickles n snacks, the coming generations would find it hard to believe that such stuff was ever prepared at home. I also make the effort to learn folk songs esp from my aunts n granny so that family weddings n special occasions are not dominated by ONLY bollywood songs n item numbers.
Small bit but my bit :)

Dithi said...

What a beautiful Diwali post .... with two women who are on my mind more often than not :) - two very special energies that circle me as i take happy steps with the rainbow shining over my wings in the clear blue skies :)

Tradition is to us what a web of roots is to a tree, it connects us to our origin, nurtures us and the more we draw from it - the stronger we stand and move towards the light :)

I am most curious and intrigued by what my roots can take me back to, i love going back in time in my mind's eye through my travels, through the works of artists (various forms of art); every moment spent in India, in Bengal, in Kolkata is even more special since it gives me the chance to explore and re-construct the million stories that hide behind the old Kolkata facades, the family Durga pujos, the songs and poems of rural Bengal ... the temples and festivals ... the list goes on :)

My work holds on to tradition, it draws from the charm of the past .... they are my bridges to a world of beauty that has been :)

Beautiful give-away, those photographs are precious - a super Diwali gift indeed, thank you Vineeta!

Sujayita said...

What a lovely post! And congratulations on the blog anniversary.

Tradition, for me, is woven right into the fabric of life and we soak it up as we grow, an undeniable foundation, if you will. It is not just restricted to food or music or clothes, to me it is a continuity and awareness of the things that made us what we are. It is an exploration and sense of identification with my cultural heritage. I find the greatest pleasure in exploring older literature and music and filling up historical timelines, particularly from a woman's point of view. It is my way and trying to understand and celebrate the people who changed and shaped the world so that we can actually be freer than many of them were.

Smita Rangesh said...

What a lovely post! I had to come out of lurkdom and comment - the giveaway is soo compelling:)

Tradition to me is what takes me back to my childhood- to love - to my mother and grandmothers... the memories of how any particular ritual/ custom was observed..drawing a kolam in front of the house,lighting the lamp each day in front of the deity, having an oil bath after sitting on the floor in a row and having nalangu applied to our feet and then oil as well in the cold wee hours of a deepavali morning soo excited to be wearing new clothes and waiting for ma and paati to finish prayers just so we could eat all the goodies and light sparklers :) Tradition means something as simple as a sunday morning brunch so we can all go out some place together just like those days when there was no tv at home to spoil our togetherness..
How I try to bring in tradition now is try and do whatever possible from our(mine and my husbands) childhood with my daughter so that she develops a love and pride in her roots.. We have my inllaws living with us to show her and me the way it was and has been done for generations in their family..i am rambling- but this word evokes such a train of thoughts.. Thank you for the chance given to go back and think about how it was and how it is :) with a smile...

Jaya said...

Tradition to me is something that is close to my heart that I pass it on to my kids and keep it going to theirs. It is a Bond with memories. My grandmother used to do rangoli in the evening during Laxmi puja.. all us cousins used to help her and I have carried that on and my kids help me now. It is our bond our special moment that reminds me of Diwali with my grand ma and hoping that reminds my kids about us and keep it going..

pooja kopargaonkar said...

As a kid Tradition was just celebrating festivals and eating yummy sweets and getting gifts, but as I grow older I got to know the importance of tradition and how beautiful it makes our lives.

Tradition is something which bonds me with people around me and who have come before me in this world, It gives me a chance to connect with family, friends, people and to myself also, It makes me learn things which makes me a more wiser person. Tradition make us respect people, things, god and most importantly ourselves. It teaches me that good wins over evil, that we should always help people and never forget to pray to god, It give me a chance to pray for my brother on rakhi and ask god to keep him safe, it make us remember our ancestors and It is our traditions which gives us hope and light.

What I do to keep traditions alive?

well I respect my traditions and also other people's.

respecting each-other's traditions is the initial key to support tradition and keep them alive,

Being from a family who loves traditions and culture, I love to go to art and crafts fair with my mom and always encourage people to support the artisans and our traditions.Also i try to learn as much as i can about traditions.

I feel proud and happy that my family passed the traditions to me of learning about our culture and indian traditions and I would love to keep the spark of tradition alive always



terracecorner said...

1. Tradition for me is- something that my family strongly believes in and have our feet firmly grounded in it, with practises and principles passed down to many generations all together.

2. There are many things I do, (unknowingly and comes naturally to me) to keep some of these traditional practises alive in me; leaving my footwear at the doorstep before entering the house, having food by hand, having a strong cup of filter kappi the first thing in the morning, looking forward to wearing a kancheevaram saree on special occassions, the pottu on my forehead (though it has shrink in size), i call my mother amma and not mummy :), i dont cross legs in front of the elders, and the list goes on. Nevertheless, tradition is not something that you should try hard to practise, it should come naturally, and that comes only if you believe in it..

Anu@My Dream Canvas said...

Tradition to me is simply my parents and my grandparents :) Sorry, I know it sounds very simplistic :) My roots are defined by these very people. I try to remember the simple things they have shared with me over the years. It translates into my everyday life and how I celebrate festivals with my children and what I teach them about life in general.

Thanks for a fabulous Giveaway!!

Chitra said...

Remembering my childhood days with what i did with my parents, year after year for every single festival. It is an imprint in my brain that i would like to pass it on to my child. Every single occasion has a routine and a ritual and repeating those simple rituals take me back to where i belong. Beautiful giveaway, Vineeta. Happy Deepavali to you too. Best, Chitra

Simple Me- or rather Complex Me? said...

Love your blog, your photos and your work. I also love the question that you posed about tradition snd what it means to each one of us. To me, it keeps me connected to my roots. No matter how influenced we may be by other cultures, through our education, work or travels perhaps, traditions remain our connection to where we really belong. I feel that they keep us grounded. I really lament the fact that we are not as keen on keeping traditions as we used to. The hectic routine of everyday life, the far distances we have to travel to meet with family and friends as well as lack of knowledge of some of these traditions - for theyounger generations - are all factors. By the way, today is the first day of the new hijri year. My mother used to make sure we had something white for breakfast on this day so the new year would be pure and peaceful. Today, 27 years after she passed away, I started my day with that glass of fresh white milk and murmured a prayer for her.

Malathi Br said...

Tradition is behavior/ practices that we imbibe from my family mostly unknowingly – it just happens to you. I am going to list out the 2 favorite ones.

1. Starting my sari collection!!! – I grew up in a family that is fond of their silks and have been part of many a discussion where my granny, mother and aunts discuss all things sari like color combinations, patterns, quality of silk, smoothness. This is sometimes followed by a session where all the saris are taken out of the closet and admired  The bug finally bit me when my cousin got married 2 years back – will try to give you a picture of my collection  - kanchi sari with a bright bougainvillea color body and a dull orange & zari border; kanchi sari with dark maroon body and a forest green border; a double shaded tomato red and mithai pink sari with intricate thread work in cream color for the border and pallu. It is uncanny how I show the same kind of admiration and reactions!!

2. Flowers have a special place during worship. Our house that has a beautiful garden. During Gauri Ganesha festival, I go to the wholesale market and buy as many flowers as possible. This place is crowded, noisy and full of slush during rains. But none of this actually registers in my brain as the sight of the millions of hues completely overpowers all other senses. On the day of festival, I help my mother by arranging all the elements required (called shodashopachara puja – or 16 step worship). Initially I did this to help her and make her happy but now I enjoy it.

I discovered Mora and Artnlight thru Color Caravan and am in awe of the work that you are doing. Way to go, ladies!

Cheers
Malathi

Andi of My Beautiful Adventures said...

These photos are just gorgeous! My big tradition is traveling somewhere fabulous every NYE with my hubby. I think it's so important to ring in the new year surrounded by love and excitement.

bornfree said...

Tradition to me is that fuzzy feeling that reminds me of who I am and of home, even though I live hundreds of miles away. It is that instinct that makes me want to wear a saree all of a sudden, or spend hours in the kitchen trying to make 'therattipal' (a TamBram sweet) for Diwali, or chatter away mindlessly on the phone just so that I can speak in my mother-tongue.

And what do I do to keep it alive in my life ? I just listen to my instinct, because deep down is where my tradition lies. :-)

Vineeta, I discovered your blog recently and just love your decoupaged boxes. They are such a visual delight ! Thanks for the fabulous give-away. Would love to own a Mora; have been coveting them from the Facebook page :-)

AOK said...

Tradition is reviving
Tradition is reinventing
Tradition is being tireless
Tradition is values
Tradition in our house during Diwali is some of these and simple but practical celebrations of diyas painted, rangoli by kids on a platter and enjoying with friends and family who share their values and beliefs surrounded by plenty of food and drinks

blandina said...

Tradition is the link between the past and the future, without tradition there is no continuity.
Traditional feminine arts like weaving, sewing, knitting and embroiderying are less practised or plainly disappearing. I am always willing to teach to anybody who asks me, including my daughters, and to show that using your hands is really a matter of the heart.

shaoli said...

For me traditions are the bridge connecting my past to my future(my son)by creating wonderful memories along the way.Be it living in US or UK tradition has been making that gujiya or nimki ;lighting those 14 lamps for our forefathers and taking the special oil bath.I hope my son has memories of these moments and these for him would mean our special traditions.

Sudha said...

tradition is what binds my four day old son with my grandparents and his :)

Sharkara@Sensitivecreation said...

Tradition - for me it would be to be deeply rooted, like a banayan tree , as much it goes in circumference , as much deep the roots are , knowing your values your origin and following it where ever you are :) Happy Diwali !! Vineeta and Ritika ...both of you are gorgeous and inspirational...

Arpana Annie Gupta said...

In a world of uncertainty and turmoil, of unrest and discomfort, culture means hope. Culture means the desire to connect the past with the future. Culture grounds one yet propels one forward with a sense of courage and determination. Culture connects what has been with what will be....

Vanisha @ Vanishas Life In...Australia said...

I'm not very big on traditions as such. Often I find unless we understand the meaning and the 'why' behind the tradition it's difficult to truly embrace. My husband and I develop our own traditions, we take something 'traditional' and give it our own twist and our own meaning. We work it into our everyday lives. We keep 'tradition' alive but trying to live it everyday.

Ajita said...

Wishing you a very Happy Diwali !!
The True meaning of the word Tradition was understood by me during our 5years stay in Trinidad and Tobago ...Tradition to me is passing on the Values ,Rituals to generation to generation .it was amazing to see how Trinidadian Indians are following certain Hindu traditions .They are so far away from India ,and very curious to know everything about India .Most of them have never visited India but they are very proud to call themselves "Trinidadian Indians "...I was amazed to see the way they celebrate Diwali .They celebrate Carnival and Diwali with the same enthusiasm .Diwali in Trinidad is huge and very authentic .Its super to see the way they decorate the entire place with a unique way of lighting Diyas ..no Chinese stuff ...but very authentic ..they cut the big bamboo into half bend it in semi circle and then put clay Diyas into the cavity of bamboo and make a design.The entire village gets lit up by these beautiful decorations of Diyas ..it has a lot of simplicity, Genuineness and love.it was a Divine experience to me ..now I feel that's the way to pass on tradition .Hindu people in Trinidad fast during Diwali,Go to temples ,make sweets and invite friends over .A typical family consist of a perfect mix of culture ..they will have grandparents who are Hindus ,son married to Muslim,Their daughter married to a afro american and so on ..but interesting to see how respectfully they treat each others traditions .And celebrate each and every festival with a lot of warmth n their heart...Its a cultural "Chutney" totally ....but with a smooth blend !

Neelu said...

Hi Vineeta,

Tradition for me means...something which i pass on to my 8-year-old daughter. Apart from good manners, i believe this is the only legacy i hope she carries forward with her. Festivals are a big thing in our house where we both form a team, right from decoration to making eateries.. to wearing new clothes. I make sure that i tell her the relevant story for that festival.:-).. so remembers it forever. Also, there is one more tradition that i follow with my husband.. never to stay in our hometown for our marriage anniversary.. we go for a wonderful 2-week vacation and celebrate our anniversary there. Since we made a pact, we are making sure that we are doing it every year without fail :-)

Neelu said...

Hi Vineeta,

Tradition for me means...something which i pass on to my 8-year-old daughter. Apart from good manners, i believe this is the only legacy i hope she carries forward with her. Festivals are a big thing in our house where we both form a team, right from decoration to making eateries.. to wearing new clothes. I make sure that i tell her the relevant story for that festival.:-).. so remembers it forever. Also, there is one more tradition that i follow with my husband.. never to stay in our hometown for our marriage anniversary.. we go for a wonderful 2-week vacation and celebrate our anniversary there. Since we made a pact, we are making sure that we are doing it every year without fail :-)

mailid: contact_neelu@yahoo.co.in

deepali said...

HI
I am commenting for the first time on your blog.. The temptation is too big :)
What tradition means to me? It means what i would like to pass on to my daughter. It means what i would like my daughter to remember me for. Its a beautiful way for me to create memories for my daughter which i hope she will cherish fondly for her life time...
What i do to keep it alive? Every ritual or tradition which is passed on to me by my mother.. I think about it deeply. I think background behind it, whether it can be applied in entirety in the present time, practicality of it along with its effects on environment and human life. If it satishies all criteri, then i follow it and involve my daughter in it... like making rangolis of flowers for all days during onam, navratri and diwali, worshipping god by lighting diya in the evening and thanking him for all what he has given without asking him more...

AnuG said...

J'adore! The story behind the giveaway and the alive! pics of the ever-alive Ritika :).
Sudha and Dithi said it beautifully...
To me, tradition is inseparable from values. The tradition of making pongal comes from the value of respecting and celebrating the harvest of the land. Lighting diyas comes from the value of appreciating that light dispenses darkness, literally and figuratively. Inviting folk over on a festival to share food and joy comes from the value of building relationships and - sharing.
A thing, an act, a process of creating, or practicing, becomes tradition when I pass the message on to the next gen, and not the act...

Anonymous said...

Anything done habitually, out of love, and because it is important to you, becomes a part of traditions you choose to observe. It embodies the extravagant, as well as the day-to-day way in which we live our lives. The way I conduct my life, celebrate festivals, and hope to bring up my daughter clearly reflects the above. A tradition I follow or what my mother does, and my grandma earlier did, and what I do in spite of all the trouble collecting ‘ pooja samagri’ in foreign land entails, is my elaborate (at least by my standards) Diwali pooja.

Priyanka

Divs said...

Tradition for me has always been a confusion of sorts. Being the product of a mixed marriage where both my parents didnt try to get us to choose any path only added to the muddle. So any tradition that we do follow, is what we created and thats makes it so special and personal. My husband finds it cute and funny and joins in all the merriment too. I will make sure that my baby will understand the significance of the "silly" things we do..and one day, maybe she can add her own touches to this too. Thank you for doing this. Just putting this down has been..therapeutic :)

Radha K said...

Hi Vineeta,
I would like to thank Ritika and U for giving this beautiful opportunity to win a Mora Stole
giveaway.

Tradition, for me, is not a mere belief that is passed on, but it is something that is evolved in a human beings life... it is something that has evolved within me and has made me a better person. It is a way that helps me to connect myself to the past heritage. A small thing like getting up in the morning and touching the feet of my elders is tradition to me. These small little acts are my way of keeping my traditions alive.

Thank you:)

nbhupalam@gmail.com said...

Traditions are cultural moorings that help us meander our lives with roots firmly anchored in the quintessence of our social ethos. Traditions are nuggets of wisdom, culture specific, colorful, eclectic, and intriguing at times, inherently evolving, only to help us address the mundane and vital with zest and vivacity.

Traditions also enable us to be ennobling, reinforce the vitals, simplify the obscure, and propel the human self from mundane to higher self. Traditions in essence are unique cultural constructs that assists us to deal with the hues and shades of life with much more gaiety.

I for myself, do appreciate the tenets, practice the essence and disseminate the import of such age old traditions. I have inculcated genre of traditions from my earlier generation, imbibed the current generation so as to equip the future generations.

Traditions permeate everyday of my life and at every stage of life. Hindu Ceremonies that are an integral part of my life, to day-to-day activities such as prostration before elders, that signify not only respect for elders but also acknowledge the accumulated wisdom of such elders and a willingness to receive such wisdom in the form of blessings, a simple namaste to fellow human being, to signify the essential Truth that every living being has the same Soul that we bow to; festive celebrations with their unique drama & character, and plethora of rituals such as vrathas, pujas, homas, etc that nudges the ignorant person on a wholesome path for a purposeful life, with a dash of zest, hope, involve and bond communities to realize the often repeated noble idiom “Vasudaiva Kutumbam”

Sangeetha said...

We have a "tradition" in every thing we do, how we put the kids to sleep, teh stories we read, teh activities we do. I guess it is mixing up rituals with traditions and hence creating new ones

Preeti said...

To me creating a small world in UK away from homeland has been a challenge..very much like few others. I am thankful to God to have givenn me the opportunity to explore the East and the West ends of the world. Things can be overwhelming when away from home. No holidays on festivals, other commitments make it all the more difficult to follow the traditions. My family chose to pick the good from both the cultures and celebrate them. Hence, rather than spending huge amounts on firecrackers, we make sure our kitchen is filled with aromas of baked and roasted Indian sweets and savouries. Less on firecrackers cause I know a few who suffer from breathing issues, and working in a special needs school, I realised many children can't cope with the noise! The importance is getting together, worshipping Goddess Laxmi, to realise the presence of the supreme power guiding us to be good in all kinds of challenging situations. I invite a few friends during the weekend to celebrate. Paying respect to elderly and showering love to the youngsters, celebrating the moments with laughter is all we look forward to in festivals now:) I hope I can keep the traditions of celebration alive for my son in this unique way...keeping the good part alive.

Chandan said...

One word with many connotations, implications and contradictions. Traditon is what keeps the past alive in different ways. A story my Mom used to tell me comes to mind. A woman while breaking would pinch out a side of her mince pies before placing the baking dish into the oven. After years of doing so each time she would bake, she was asked why? Her answer was `family tradition'. I always saw my mom do it so I do it too. "It helps bake better pies somehow. " The question was taken to the mother, who said something similarly unconvincing; ` I pinch out the sides because I saw my mom do it.’ The enquiry was then taken three generations back, and here is what the grand old lady had to say, " Oh I just had a small oven back then, and the pie would not fit without pinching the edge just a bit”!!
If a tradition is an inherited, established or customary pattern of thought, action or behavior, the above story illustrates it like none other!
Constructive, destructive or down right quirky, we inherit the past in very many ways, and as a generation ahead, we are in the unique position to decide what persists and what does not. It all depends on what we choose as individuals. Will our past empower and embolden us? Or will it stop confuse and persist as a mere matter of habit and practice?
To me tradition is both- what we inherit from our personal and social history, personal and what we pass on to our future generations. There is much to say on the subject when one starts to think, but it all comes together in Mora’s red dot fittingly. An effort of inheriting the past in ancient textile traditions, justifying a whole way of life and thought process and yet lending the age old wisdom a brand new idiom that can find relevance to a whole new generation of people.

Chandan said...

oops... And winding up what I do to keep tradition alive, is constantly reasses, question, and examine old values and ideas and at the same time reinvent and evolve. Always keep that which enriches, beautifes, helps and works. Also, always make room for nostalgia and memory, but never identify with the past just for the heck of the past.

Play Angry-Bird Game said...

wish u happy new year